GERALD BRENAN SOUTH FROM GRANADA PDF

August 3, 2020   |   by admin

Part autobiography, part travelogue, and wholly a tribute to the unspoilt beauty of southern Spain, Gerald Brenan’s South from Granada includes an introduction. South from Granada has ratings and 44 reviews. Paul said: The First World War had a powerful effect on many of its participants; Gerald Brenan was on. Between and , Gerald Brenan lived in the remote Spanish village of Yegen and “South of Granada” depicts his time there, vividly evoking the essence .

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El momento en lo captaba mejor, y cuando se presentaba con mayor intensidad, era en las noches de luna llena. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — South from Granada by Gerald Brenan. An amusing and insightful account of Spanish village life from a brilliant interpreter of Spain to the rest of the world The Times.

Paperbackpages. Published July 1st by Kodansha first published March 28th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about South from Granadaplease sign up.

Lists with This Book. Jun 21, Paul rated it really liked it Shelves: The First World War had a powerful effect on many of its participants; Gerald Brenan was one of those. Brenan came from an Anglo-Irish military family. He had the usual public school education, hated it and was bullied. He was expected to go into the army, but at 18 elected instead to walk to China with a friend John Hope-Johnstone. They made it to the Balkans, but events intervened.

Brenan served in the army for the whole of the war. In he decided to move to Spain and chose the remote Alpu The First World War had a powerful effect on many of its participants; Gerald Brenan was one of those. In he decided to move to Spain and chose the remote Alpujurras district in southern Spain. He also selected an even more remote village, Yegen. He stayed there on and off for some years and here he recounts his experiences.

Brenan was a good observer and documenter; his descriptive powers are excellent. The s in Yegen were in time before the disruption of the civil war. Its very remoteness meant that modern life had not reached it and the lifestyle and culture had remained the same for centuries. Brenan wanted to write and he transported by mule several hundred books to his remote hideaway.

His plan was to immerse himself in the classics and learn to write properly.

He had a small amount of money and a small pension from the army and had to live frugally. His journey was difficult and he had no set destination, stumbling on Yegen by accident. He immerses himself in village life and is accepted by the local inhabitants; a willingness to learn the language and to be hospitable and accepting all helped.

The only other graanada in the area was an embittered Scottish alcoholic, who despite having a Spanish btenan, refused to learn the language. Although he was only nine miles away, Brenan only visited once. Brenan was on the edge of the Bloomsbury group. He was brnean close friend of Ralph Partridge and had an affair with Dora Carrington. Brenan describes various visits to his nrenan domicile. The Woolfs were better guests, not minding the asceticism and loving the countryside and also providing intellectual stimulus.

Brenan provides vivid portraits of local residents. There are descriptions of relationships between the sexes which depended heavily on long established ritual before and after marriage. Village society depended geraod the rules being kept and generally they were.

However collectively the community did force some recompenses as with one woman who had been taken advantage of who received her olive oil in larger quantities than anyone else. It is an odd story, but Brenan as he usually does, leaves the reader to make their minds up about the characters described.

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Brenan also describes in detail the local plants and animals, the topography, archaeology and the perils of berald. He describes visits to Grenada and travels in the local area. All in all it is an engaging account, written by someone who loved Spain. Brenan wrote a great deal more about his life in Spain and the ganada war. He was only allowed back into Spain in because of his criticism of the Franco Regime. He lived in southern Spain for the rest of his life. I first read this years ago when I was reading a great deal about the Bloomsbury set Strachey, Virginia and Leonard Tranada, Vanessa Bell et al and became aware of Gerald Brenan as gedald interesting peripheral figure.

I remembered enjoying it then, and a couple of vividly described anecdotes such as Strachey’s miserable mule ride across mountain tracks to Brenan’s not-very-civilised village home stuck with me over the decades.

I found bgenan Folio Society edition in the local second hand book shop, cou I first read this years ago when I was reading a great deal about the Bloomsbury set Strachey, Virginia and Leonard Woolf, Vanessa Bell et al and became aware of Gerald Brenan as an interesting peripheral figure.

I found a Folio Society edition in the local second hand book shop, couldn’t resist it and have so enjoyed reading geraald anew that I have put it under ‘Favourites’. Brenan lived in the remote village of Yegen, in the Alpujarra south of Granada, for six or seven years between and’rebelling’ he suggests, ‘against English middle-class life’. He must have been a strange phenomenon to the people amongst whom he lived, but never felt anything but welcome in this poor, peasant society, where only two men apart from him had been born outside the village and those only a few miles away.

South from Granada: A Sojourn in Southern Spain

He gloried in the backwardness, the traditionalism,even the illiteracy of the peasants among whom he live; sotuh of the Pyrenees, he believed, “one finds a society which puts the deeper needs of human nature before the technical organization that is required to tp provide a higher standard of living.

This is a land that nourishes at the same time the sense for poetry and the sense for reality and neither of these accords with the utilitarian outlook”‘. Brenan’s observations are acute, affectionate but not sentimental or romantic. And he observed widely, sometimes almost with an anthropologist’s eye, sometimes with the eye of a naturalist, often with humour. First published inwritten in the s after both the Spanish Civil War the subject of another of Brenan’s books and World War II, I feel that Brenan’s analytical eye and his recall of incidental detail became clearer with time.

His prose is brilliant, his imagery often brings you up short in its unexpectedness. He captures the look, smell and gestures of neighbours, mountain shepherds, gypsies, village children, cave dwellers, young courting couples. He writes of village customs and traditions, archaeology, eccentric individuals, peasant life, fairs,animals, politics, love affairs and the visits of english friends and acquaintances, including Strachey and the Woolfs.

There are a few black and white photographs and it is wonderful to be able to look up some of the villages and districts he describes to get coloured images of this vivid area of Spain. It’s not something you can dip into and out of and is most rewarding when you pay it full attention. View all 5 comments.

All I have aimed at is to entertain a few armchair travellers, who may enjoy whiling away a rainy night in reading of how people live in remote mountain villages in the serene climate of the South Mediterranean.

This book left me cold. Shortly thereafter, he moves into a little town in the Alpujarras and brings along with him hundreds of books, with the int All I have aimed at is to entertain a few armchair travellers, who may enjoy whiling away a rainy night in reading of how people live in remote mountain villages in the serene granaea of the South Mediterranean. Shortly thereafter, he moves into a little town in the Alpujarras and brings along with him hundreds of books, with the intention of educating himself.

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It is hard for me to think of a more promising start to a memoir. But as I turned the last page, I felt only relief that the book was over and I could move on.

The book was written about twenty years later, and published And this, despite all of the things this book has going for it: His fullest portraits in this book are of his landlord, his granara, a drunken Scottish person who lived a few grranada away, and his friends who came to visit him.

Maybe he spent most of his time reading? As that list suggests, Brenan was an exceptionally well-rounded and well-educated man. Yet for me this book taught the opposite lesson: Otherwise, you end up like Brenan, with a superficial understanding of many things but a deep understanding of nothing in particular.

And indeed, much of the book is very impressively written. Nevertheless, even here Brenan irked me a little. One flies over the villages in the air, one seens their strange names on the map, one may even, if one granwda the main road, bump past them in a car, but their life remains as mysterious at that girl with the unforgettable face one caught sight of for a moment through the granava of a railway carriage.

I would come back tired and stiff from a long expedition and, while I washed and changed my clothes, the fire would be lit and a meal brought in.

My post would be waiting for me and a copy of the Froom —that ancestor of the New Statesman —and over my coffee I would read my letters and begin to answer them. There are too many generalities in this book and not enough specifics; there is too much description and not enough action.

Nevertheless, the book redeems itself in several places.

I actually got the feeling that Brenan was not a little in love with Woolf, his descriptions of her are so vivid and so thoughtful. The brothels themselves sounded dull, but the companion Brenan takes with him was a real character. In any case, it must be admitted that this book is probably the most readable account of a time and place that no longer exists.

South from Granada: A Sojourn in Southern Spain by Gerald Brenan

According to the Wikipedia article, now there is a sizeable expat community of British people living in the town, probably in part thanks to this book. Wasted potential is always vexing.

Although it was first published over half a century ago, Gerald Brenan’s “South from Granada” is still considered by many to be the canonical text about the Alpujarra region of Spain’s Sierra Nevada, the standard against which all other work is judged. Does it deserve its exalted reputation? You’ll get no argument from me. Brenan writes intelligently and fluidly, and his account is always interesting, whether he is writing about his own personal experiences, or about his neighbors and the local c Although it was first published over half a century ago, Gerald Brenan’s “South from Granada” is still considered by many to be the canonical text about the Alpujarra region of Spain’s Sierra Nevada, the standard against which all other work is judged.

Brenan writes intelligently and fluidly, and his account is always interesting, whether he is writing about his own personal experiences, or about his neighbors and the local customs of the Alpujarra.